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Turquoise Puya

 

Parrot Impatiens "Hare's Hybrid"

Impatiens niamniamensis

 

Please be careful removing your plant from it's packaging.

Soil -- Your Impatiens likes rich, moist soil that is well-draining.  A typical mix is 1 part potting soil or coir fiber to 1 part perlite, with a little fertilizer mixed in. 

Pot size -- Repot your plant to about a 1 gallon container that has drainage holes.   It may eventually need to be transferred to a 3 gallon container if you let it grow to full size.

Transplanting -- Transplant gently to avoid damaging the roots.  After transplanting, do not pack down the soil.  Shade the plant from sun for the first 3 weeks.

Watering -- For the first month, ensure that the original soil ball remains moist.  While this Impatiens appreciates moisture, the soil should not be perpetually soggy either.  I recommend using a moisture meter probe, which you can buy at garden centers for about $5.  You simply stick the probe deep into the soil and water whenever the needle is less than halfway across the dial.

I recommend using rainwater or bottled spring water for at least the first few weeks until your plant resumes active growth.  Avoid using water filters like Brita or Pur, which add sodium to the water. 

Light -- This Impatiens doesn't need a whole lot of direct sun - just bright light.  It grows well in morning + late afternoon sun, or tree-filtered sun all day.  Shade it from hot, midday sun. 

Climate -- The ideal temperature is between 50 and 85 degrees. In warmer areas, avoid placing it in areas where heat can collect, like near a sunny wall.  Protect your plant from all frost.  You may grow it indoors, provided that the air isn't too dry.  If the humidity is below around 50%, consider using a room humidifier.

Fertilizing -- Your Impatiens has average fertilizing needs. During periods of active growth, give it a balanced fertilizer once every 3-4 week, according to the dosage on the label. Yellowing older leaves may mean the plant needs more fertilizer.. or it could be a sign of over- or under-watering.  Be careful not to over-fertilize.

Pruning -- It's not necessary to prune your plant, although you may wish to shape it or remove excessive growth. You can remove as much or as little from a branch as you want.  As long as you leave at least 1 green "nub" below the cut, new branches will grow from there.  Removing a mature branch will encourage new growth, so don't be afraid to cut your plant back periodically.  Just avoid removing more than 20% of the branches in a week.   

Pests to watch for: aphids, mealy bugs, scale, fungus gnats.

Have fun growing it!  

Jeff

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Turquoise Puya

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