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Turquoise Puya

Griffinia espiritensis - the "mini Worsleya"

The beautiful blooms of Griffinia espiritensis are almost a miniature version of the closely-related Worsleya - the legendary "blue Amaryllis".  This is an endangered rainforest species from Brazil's Atlantic Forest, about 90% of which has been destroyed by people.  The bulb sends up a gorgeous flower spike with bluish-lavender blooms, whose glowing color is difficult to capture in photos.  The plant has attractive, glossy leaves that often have spots.  Despite its exotic look, it's an easy bulb that makes a terrific houseplant!  It is uncommon in cultivation and rarely seen for sale.

Griffinia espiritensis - the "mini Worsleya"

The bulb's leaves are evergreen and grow to about 8 inches tall.  About half of the leaves have white spots.  The bulb can grow quite large, and it multiplies readily with baby bulbs, which you may separate.  The plant is capable of flowering multiple times per year, not just once like many Amaryllis relatives.  The bulbs can have multiple flower stalks, each about 8 to 10 inches tall, with 7 to 10 blooms per stalk.  The flowers are almost 2 inches across, which is unusually large for Griffinias.

Griffinia espiritensis - the "mini Worsleya"

This Griffinia is very easy to grow.  Optimal temperatures are between 60 and 90 degrees F (15-33 degrees C).  It can go dormant in cool temperatures, and it needs protection from frost.  It does well in a small pot in fertile, well-draining soil that's kept evenly moist.  A typical soil mix is 1 part potting soil to 1 part perlite or coarse sand.  In the wild, it grows under dense forest cover, so it is happiest in bright shade.  Protect it from strong sun exposure.  Over about 40-45% humidity is preferred.  You'll be surprised how easy and low-maintenance it is!

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Tips on planting the bulb

 

 

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Turquoise Puya

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