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Let the fireworks begin! 

Manettia bicolor - Firecracker plant

 The Candy Corn Plant - also known as the Firecracker Vine - is just about the perfect plant.  The flowers are stunning, it's always in bloom, it's easy to grow, not picky about light, it has great foliage, and it grows well indoors.  Is there anything bad about this plant?  Hmm, let me think for a moment..  Well, it doesn't take freezing temperatures too well.  But if you can protect it from frost, this will be one of your favorite plants.  It is mine.  Wherever you put it, the Candy Corn Plant will light up your garden with hundreds of eye-catching flowers! 

Firecracker Vine - Manettia luteo-rubra

The Candy Corn Plant (Manettia bicolor) is a distant relative of coffee (Rubiaceae family).  Its tubular blossoms are bright reddish-orange tipped with yellow, making them look like lit fireworks, or pieces of candy corn.  These unusual blooms are just under an inch long and are fuzzy and firm to the touch.  They cover the plant practically all year.  Firecracker Vine gracefully twines its way up a trellis or arbor, eventually covering it with glossy, oval leaves.  It is vigorous and fast growing, and easily pruned to any size that's convenient.

Firecracker Vine - Manettia luteo-rubra

Photo courtesy of Alejandro Bayer Tamayoarten

It comes from mountain forests of Brazil, where temperatures are mild all year.  It grows great at normal household temperatures, and it tolerates cool conditions too (but as stated earlier, not frost).  It likes bright, filtered light, and will probably need some protection from strong afternoon sun.  Give it a typical, well-draining soil mix, and keep it evenly moist.  Over about 40% humidity is best.  It doesn't need much else to keep the fireworks going! 

Firecracker Vine - Manettia luteorubra

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Detailed growing tips about this plant

 

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